Greenhills Christian Fellowship York
WHAT CHRIST BRINGS ON CHRISTMAS

Click below to expand the sermon notes.

Christ Brings a Heart of Healing
Christ Brings a Household of Hope
Christmas Brings a Haven of Happiness

CHRISTMAS BRINGS A HOUSEHOLD OF HOPE

Matthew 1:1-17

Today, our Christmas message will focus on what the original Christmas sought to bring in a world of hardship, harshness, & hurt. We will learn that the Christ of Christmas came to give hope (1:1-17). In Matthew 1:1-17, how did the first Christmas bring hope to the hurting world?

I. THE CHRIST OF CHRISTMAS IS OUR SOURCE OF HOPE (1:1, 17)

Matthew begins his Gospel with a record of Jesus’ genealogy (i.e., book of genesis [or origins] or birth record). What’s amazing about the record is the 4-fold presentation of the Christmas celebrant: (1) “Jesus” (1:1; cf. 1:16, 18, 21, 25) – meaning “Saviour” (from “Joshua” [Yahweh saves]), not just from physical danger or death but from sin (1:21); (2) “Christ” (1:1; cf. 1:16, 17, 18) – meaning “Messiah” or “Anointed One,” who represents God’s people & brings God’s rule over us; (3) “son of David” (1:1; cf. 9:27; 12:22-23; 15:22; 20:30-31) – meaning heir to the throne & kingdom of righteousness & justice, bringing healing & wholeness; & (4) “son of Abraham” (1:1; cf. 3:9; 8:11) – meaning related to God’s covenant people that blesses “all nations” (Gen. 12:18; Matt. 28:19). Thus, Jesus Christ, the son of David & son of Abraham, is our source of hope!

II.  THE CHRIST OF CHRISTMAS GIVES HOPE TO THE HOPELESS (1:2-16)

Matthew’s genealogy of Jesus was traced from the line of Joseph (1:16), Jesus’ foster-father. The expression “the father of” occurs 18x in this passage, yet there were 5 unusual women who were included in the list; namely: (1) “Tamar” (1:3) – the woman who played prostitute (Gen. 38:24); (2) “Rahab” (1:5) – the prostitute from Jericho (Josh. 2:1); (3) “Ruth” (1:5) – the outsider woman from Moab (Ruth 1:4); (4) “Solomon’s mother who had been Uriah’s wife” (1:6) – Bathsheba, the woman who committed adultery (2 Sam. 11:2-5); & (5) “Mary” (1:16) – the woman found to be with child through the Spirit (1:18-19). These women, like modern-day people, are found to be in seemingly hopeless crises. But Jesus chose to be identified with them by blood. Now, by the blood of Jesus, He brings hope to us in our times of hopelessness.

 

Ending the Year Well (Semon Series Break)

HOW TO END THE YEAR RIGHT & START THE NEW YEAR WELL

(Psalm 40:1-8)

As we end 2018 & enter 2019 this week, we ask: “How are we end this year right & start New Year well?” Given the smiles & successes, struggles & setbacks of this year, what can prepare us for the new sets of smiles & struggles this New Year? With Psalm 40:1-8 as our Bible text, we will be able to answer these questions & learn how to brace ourselves for what’s ahead.

I. ________WITH HOPE FOR THE LORD (40:1-3)David shared how he faced a past challenge in his personal life: “I waited patiently for the Lord” (i.e., to intently look with hope, to expect eagerly; 40:1, cf. 37:7, 34; 38:15; 33:20; 39:7; 42:5, 11; 43:5). It includes constantly praying to God, in the midst of delay, without doubt of God’s answer. This kind of hope & patience brings outstanding results (40:2-3). For 2019, wait with hope & patience for the Lord!

II. TRUST THE LORD FOR HIS __________ (40:4-5)David shared who the “blessed” person is: “who makes the Lord his trust” (i.e., shows confident commitment & dependence on God, not on false objects of faith [cf. 33:16-17]; 40:3, cf. 33:12; 34:8; 37:3, 5). We’re to trust God, because He is faithful to fulfill His wonderful plans for us (40:5). For 2019, trust the Lord to work His wonders!

III. DESIRE THE LORD AND HIS _________ (40:6-8)David shared that God does not delight in offering, as He does in obedience (40:6). David also desired God (cf. 27:4; 34:4a; 37:4; 42:1-2), His will & Word: “I desire to do your will, O my God; your law is within my heart” (40:8). Being in the Word & under the Word heightens our desire for God. For 2019, desire the Lord & His Word!